Shaping radio today and tomorrow

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The A-300 broadcast console was designed to set new standards in on-air consoles for performance, function and design. Features included total logic control, three-bank lighted source selector and Program and Audition output assign switches, long-throw conductive plastic faders, electronic or transformer-balanced inputs and outputs, and total modular construction in any size mainframe you require.

Station engineers were said to appreciate the Hall Effect on/off switches, easy installation interface and serviceability, gold contact connectors and rock-solid construction. Announcers liked the smooth feeling controls, lighted switches and automatic logic control system, and management loved the A-300's lasting quality and price.

The Wheatstone A-300 broadcast console was introduced in the Fall of 1983 and debuted at the 74th AES Convention in New York, Oct. 8-12, 1983. The original literature stated that the console was designed “to set new standards in on-air consoles for performance, function and design.” Its features included total logic control, three-bank lighted source selector and Program and Audition output assign switches, long-throw conductive plastic faders and electronic or transformer-balanced inputs and outputs. The console was completely modular in construction, and it was available any size mainframe.

Electronically, the A-300 featured Hall Effect on/off switches, gold contact connectors, lighted switches and automatic logic control system.

The A-300 was succeeded by the A-500.


That was then

In the January 1994 issue of Radio magazine we reported that Amati and AT&T successfully tested their in-band on-channel DAB format over the air at WPRB-FM in Princeton, NJ. The system performed well despite crowded spectrum conditions and ice storms during the test period. WPRB was chosen for its proximity to AT&T's development facility in Murray Hill, NJ, and its worst-case spectrum position, with relatively strong signals in both of its first-adjacent channels.

Similar to previous IBOC-FM tests, a separate low-power, linear RF amplifier was used as a transmitter for the digital signal. Its high level combined with WPRB's existing analog FM transmitter's output and fed to a common antenna. However, these tests also noted surprisingly successful results when the station's FM transmitter was used for the analog FM and digital signals in a low-level combined operation. Successful reception was possible in this mode with the FM transmitter running up to about half its rated power. The grounded-grid design of the 10kW FM transmitter used at WPRB may have contributed to this unexpected result, according to Amati engineers.


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