WFCR exposes more than news in its new studio


        Radio on FacebookJoin us on Facebook

Facility Showcase, Nov 2009

Chrobak lined up the office, studio and control room in a row, with a corridor running along one side to connect them. The low HVAC ductwork was re-routed away from the studio and control room to run over the corridor, so the broadcast rooms could open up to the full height available.

The studio with control room through the window. Photo courtesy Studio Technology.

The studio with control room through the window. Photo courtesy Studio Technology.

The studio and control room have a raised floor sitting on small blocks of fiberglass isolators. Double walls provide acoustic isolation, with the side corridor serving as an additional buffer. Acoustic panels were applied to all new walls in the studio and control room. The acoustical ceiling has extra sound-absorbing fiberglass backing each panel.

The old posts and beams were left partially exposed to preserve the historical qualities of the building. Instead of burying the posts within new walls, the wallboard was placed between them so the posts are visible between the acoustic panels. Instead of burying the beams behind an acoustical ceiling, the ceiling was hung between the beams, leaving four inches of the old hand-hewn wood exposed.

The brick wall running along one side of the space was once an exterior wall of the old warehouse, but had become an interior wall when a television studio was built on the other side. Demolition of the television offices revealed that the wall's window openings had been filled with unpainted cement block. This was carefully pulled out and the gaps filled with new brick treated to blend with the old.

Equipment

The control room with guests on the right and call-screener station on the far left. Photo courtesy Studio Technology.

The control room with guests on the right and call-screener station on the far left. Photo courtesy Studio Technology.

In selecting equipment and furniture for the Springfield studio, WFCR was thinking ahead to the eventual upgrading of its main studio in Amherst. The control board system, microphones, CD players and studio furniture chosen for Springfield will later be used in Amherst.

The control boards will be the biggest change, taking WFCR from the traditional architecture of stand-alone boards with audio running through their modules to a digital audio engine system. The flexibility this gives will be most valuable in the multi-control room setting of the main studio, but for consistency the same brand was installed first in the single control room of Springfield.

WFCR uses Neumann U-87 microphones in the main studio, but needed something less expensive for the Springfield studio. After careful auditioning — because the microphone has more to do with what listeners hear than most other elements of the project do — the station chose one that is much less expensive than a U-87, but good enough to use beside them — the Shure KSM44.

-- continued on page 3



Acceptable Use Policy
blog comments powered by Disqus

[an error occurred while processing this directive]

Today in Radio History

Milestones From Radio's Past

The history of radio broadcasting extends beyond the work of a few famous inventors.

EAS Information More on EAS

NWS XML/Atom Feed for CAP Messages

The feed provides feeds for all US states and territories.

Wallpaper Calendar

Radio 2014 Calendar Wallpaper

Need a calendar for your computer desktop? Use one of ours.

The Wire

A virtual press conference

Information from manufacturers and associations about industry news, products, technology and business announcements.

Join Us Facebook Twitter YouTube LinkedIn
Radio magazine cover

Current Issue

Powered by NASH: Cumulus Delivers Country From Nashville

Cumulus builds a new campus in Nashville to house its NASH family of brands

Browse Back Issues

[an error occurred while processing this directive]